OWI: Useful points of entry

If you're contemplating the switch to online writing instruction (OWI) for Fall 2020--or if this important pedagogical and curricular decision has been made on your behalf--the following short list of starting-point resources on OWI may be of some use: Applied Pedagogies: Strategies for Online Writing Instruction, eds. Daniel Ruefman and Abigail Scheg. Utah State UP,… Continue reading OWI: Useful points of entry

Mind over Chatter: Essential Skills for Navigating the Post-Truth Era

Mind over Chatter: Essential Skills for Navigating the Post-Truth Era is a series of six interactive, Canvas-based learning modules designed specifically for first-year college students and aimed at curbing the spread of problematic information in our time. Made possible by a generous grant from the Rita Allen Foundation and RTI International, these modules can be… Continue reading Mind over Chatter: Essential Skills for Navigating the Post-Truth Era

Digital Info Literacy & Online Learning in a Pandemic

"The professor's role in this new digital learning environment is not to play the role of the master of content; it is to be the master of resourcefulness. In this role, the teacher models how to think in the face of an endless torrent of information." Richard E. Miller, "On Digital Reading," Pedagogy, 2016, vol.… Continue reading Digital Info Literacy & Online Learning in a Pandemic

ENG-W 500: Teaching Composition

This fully-online, graduate-level course is an introduction to—and a history of—the field of writing studies, which goes by various names, including “composition studies,” “rhetoric and composition studies,” “composition-rhetoric,” and sometimes “rhet-comp.” This course historicizes approaches to writing instruction in the West going back as far as classical antiquity, it surveys writing studies' major movements and moments in the mid- to late 20th century in the US, and it speculates about the teaching of writing well into the 21st century. Together we study the major concepts, themes, debates, and politics of the discipline; investigate the theoretical assumptions and historical foundations that underpin the various movements within writing studies (e.g., expressivism, Writing Across the Curriculum, critical pedagogy, social constructivism, post-process, etc.); and explore the impact of digital technologies on the teaching of writing.

Teaching Statement (2012-2017)

In the following statement, I will show how I meet the criteria for Excellence in Teaching by grouping my activities and accomplishments into the following four categories cited in the IU Kokomo School of Humanities and Social Sciences Promotion and Tenure Criteria:
(1) course development and effective teaching in diverse areas; (2) my individual mentorship of students at all levels, including undergraduate and graduate research; (3) initiatives in student learning and engagement—both solo and collaborative—on my own campus, statewide, and within the entire IU system; and (4) participation in the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL).

What follows is a summary of my teaching accomplishments.

ENG-W 210: Fake News & Democracy in the Digital Age (Literacy & Public Life)

As we are often reminded, we now inhabit an increasingly complex and confusing hyper-fast media landscape, where traditional forms of journalism and reporting have been radically reshaped and even supplanted by emerging forms of digital media. This course will give you the tools to engage intelligently in the major issues of our time; to analyze media of all kinds; to parse out the subtle distinctions between various kinds of problematic information; and to find credible, carefully-researched, and accurate journalism, news, and opinion on a variety of topics.  

ENG-G 301: History of the English Language

This course examines the history of the English language from Old English to the present day, with a particular focus on its recent changes—many would say “mutations”—in the digital age. Course content covers the macro-history of the English language and the Indo-European family of languages, various local cultural histories of English, dialectical variation, and some of the basic concepts of structural linguistics (phonemes, morphemes, grammar, and syntax).