Teaching Statement (2012-2017)

In the following statement, I will show how I meet the criteria for Excellence in Teaching by grouping my activities and accomplishments into the following four categories cited in the IU Kokomo School of Humanities and Social Sciences Promotion and Tenure Criteria:
(1) course development and effective teaching in diverse areas; (2) my individual mentorship of students at all levels, including undergraduate and graduate research; (3) initiatives in student learning and engagement—both solo and collaborative—on my own campus, statewide, and within the entire IU system; and (4) participation in the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL).

What follows is a summary of my teaching accomplishments.

ENG-W 210: Fake News & Democracy in the Digital Age (Literacy & Public Life)

As we are often reminded, we now inhabit an increasingly complex and confusing hyper-fast media landscape, where traditional forms of journalism and reporting have been radically reshaped and even supplanted by emerging forms of digital media. This course will give you the tools to engage intelligently in the major issues of our time; to analyze media of all kinds; to parse out the subtle distinctions between various kinds of problematic information; and to find credible, carefully-researched, and accurate journalism, news, and opinion on a variety of topics.  

ENG-G 301: History of the English Language

This course examines the history of the English language from Old English to the present day, with a particular focus on its recent changes—many would say “mutations”—in the digital age. Course content covers the macro-history of the English language and the Indo-European family of languages, various local cultural histories of English, dialectical variation, and some of the basic concepts of structural linguistics (phonemes, morphemes, grammar, and syntax).

Research Statement (2012-2017)

My diverse research interests and background in rhetoric and composition studies have given me the tools to research and publish in a variety of academic areas, from articles on Writing across the Disciplines/Writing in the Disciplines issues and writing pedagogy to analyses of neoliberal economic rationality and academic labor.

ENG-W 132: Elementary Composition II

Given current events and student interest, the most recent version of the course (Spring 2017) led students through an exploration of so-called “fake news.” Students gained valuable experience in information literacy by analyzing and writing about the infamous #PizzaGate scandal, concepts such as “digital polarization” and “filter bubbles,” and even important epistemological questions such as “How do we know what we know?” and “Which sources of information can be trusted in the digital age?”

ENG-W 215: Intro to Rhetoric

Since its “invention” in the fifth century BCE, rhetoric—the study and practice of persuasion through language, signs, and symbols—has been a powerful force in public affairs, education, politics, and in the practice of civic life, even though today rhetoric is rarely studied outside of English and communication arts.

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